Have a Heart


Dr. Martin Luther King at a press conference.
Dr. Martin Luther King at a press conference. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

1 Samuel 16:7

English Standard Version (ESV)

7 But the Lord said to Samuel, “Do not look on his appearance or on the height of his stature, because I have rejected him. For the Lord sees not as man sees: man looks on the outward appearance, but the Lord looks on the heart.”

50 years ago, Dr. Martin Luther King marched on Washington D.C., and gave one of the most stirring speeches I have ever heard in my life.  I still get chills when I hear recordings of his landmark speech, and want to shout AMEN!

My formative years were in the South.  I have very clear and vivid memories of the race riots.  I recall that restrooms and buses and most public discourse was very divided along racial lines.   Later on in life, our family moved to Texas.  I was in 6th grade by that time.

I had family members in Mississippi who were in the Klan, and I never understood why they were so angry at everyone else.  What I did know from the Klan was, it was founded by the Democrats.  You couldn’t hold down a job in Louisiana if you weren’t a democrat, back then.  My Uncle was some kind of grand poobah in the Klan.

It wasn’t until I moved to Brownwood, Texas that I encountered different races.  I loved it.  I embraced it.  I did this because, regardless of the color of their skin, they wanted love just as bad as I did.  And I didn’t know I was supposed to not like anyone that was not white.

I heard just as much racism in Brownwood as I heard in Louisiana. This time it was divided along MANY lines; Black against White, Black against Hispanic, Hispanic against Black, Hispanic against White.  White against Black, White against Hispanic.

I still didn’t get it.  Why were the same people I was going to Church with, the ones who say Jesus is their Lord, behaving this way?  Why were Christians of other races doing this, too?

Maybe I didn’t know I was supposed to be a racist.  No one in my family ever said I needed to hate anyone.  So I didn’t.  Three of my closest friends were not white.  One was black, and gay, one was Hispanic, and one was American Indian.  It never occurred to me that their skin color should matter.  I was taught all my life that God is love, and that we are to love one another.

When I got to High School, I was the only white guy in the first ever Black History class at Brownwood High School.  I wrote my Term Paper on John Washington Carver.  That really opened my eyes.  I memorized Dr. King’s speech.  I analysed it to the nth degree.

The one thing that Dr. King asked everyone to understand was that we all live for the day when we are not judged on the basis of our skin color, but on the content of our character.

I am not saying this so “Whitey” can play up to the brother.  That is not at all my motive.  You will like me or hate me for reasons that are your own.  I cannot control that.

This is why I am writing this blog, tonight.

The prophet, Samuel, went to find the future King of Israel among the brothers of David.  God rejected all of them, then told Samuel to anoint David as the future King of Israel.   Samuel was flabbergasted.  The Oldest brother was first in line.  He was the eldest.  He was tall and handsome.  But God told Samuel that Samuel was looking only at exterior appearances, but God was looking at the intent of David’s Heart.

What is it that makes any of us worthy of anything?  What is it that makes even our enemies respect us?  It is a matter of the intent of our heart.

Do I want to hold a grudge against anyone, regardless of skin color?  What gives me that right?  If I take my judgement over the will of God for a person, I am rebelling against God.

Do I want to hold on to a bias, a racism, a hatred that is generations old?  Why?  The problem is not skin color.  It isn’t because I am white, or you are black, or Hispanic, or from the Middle East, or China or Japan, or Mars, even.  Your racism has more to do with the love you have of your desire to sin than anything another person’s skin color ever deserves.

Does it matter if that person really hates you?  NO.  Jesus said to turn the other cheek.  He said to love your enemy and pray for those who persecute you.   If racism is a problem for you, look into your own heart.  The hate is in there.  The ugly creature that loves his skin color above the will of God is the one who is the problem.

God is spirit, and is to be worshiped in Spirit and in Truth.   Jesus sent the disciples into all the world to tell of the good news of the coming of Christ.  Jesus did NOT say, only if you are a certain skin color.  He sent this message out into all the world.

Point all you want at the flagrant racism of people of other color, but first, look into your own heart.  Are you not also a racist?  Then start there.  You cannot serve the Living God and be a racist.  It ends in your world when you give your heart to Jesus Christ.

The problem is not skin color.  Not really.  The problem is the unresolved evil that lives in our own hearts.  It is easy to cure, too.  Recognize you are in sin when you are being a racist.  Confess this sin and ask Jesus into your heart.  The Spirit of God will lead you into an understanding of the ways of the Kingdom of Heaven.

The evil that lives in your soul is what makes you hate anyone else.  It is not their fault, or their problem.  Even if that other person is being a hate filled vile person who wants to kill you simply because your skin is not the same as their skin.  If Jesus is your Lord and Savior, the Spirit of God will teach you a love for them too.

No laws, no legislation, no regulation, no force on earth can change your mind about anything.  Not even God, not if you don’t want to change.  If you love swimming in the sewage of your own evil thoughts, then disregard this blog.

If you want to end racism, let the Spirit of God change you.  You can end it in your heart.  Starting with YOU is the first step to healing.  Only the Living God can change a man or woman.  But not even the Living God can change you if you do not want to change.  The only way to get this change is to realize that this sin separates you from God.  The wages of sin are death.  Jesus Christ came to this planet, as the SOn of God, and died for this sin, along with all other sin.  He rose from the dead to prove he is Lord over Life and Death.

Man has tried long enough to force a change that only God can affect in our hearts.  All mankind has done is make it worse, by emphasizing it.  God makes this a non issue by filling you with His love.

When God looks into your heart, what does He see?

Let’s Be About It!

I love you  in the name of Jesus Christ.

David G. Perkins

PS – If you are wondering if I am a white guy, I had a DNA test done. Here is my pedigree:    My line begins in Israel.  It went from there to Mesopotamia.  From Mesopotamia to Greece, where it stayed a very long while.  While it was in Greece, it had an affair with some Basque people.  After a few Centuries in the Med, we moved to Scotland.  From Scotland, to the New World.

I am a mongrel.

The Adventures of Big Sweety – Chapter 2


Beaver Creek Ranch

Chapter Two

At first, things were a struggle. Not the farm. No, Pop was away enough that everyone else had learned how to do just about everything that needed doing. But for Big Sweety, taking on those unique skills that his Dad brought home with him, became his responsibility. He was glad his Dad had taught him so much about electrical wiring, plumbing, carpentry, painting and all the things that go into turning a house into a home. He had no idea how much work his Dad must have done between adventures in the NAVY. He had lots of opportunity to apply those skills.

Between him and Momma Sweety, the “young ‘uns” had everything they needed to grow up, get an education, and learn to be responsible adults. But Big Sweety had to stay home and help his Momma. Pop’s death was hard on her, and although she always had a song in her heart, and smiled a lot, sometimes, she would get that far away look, and then would go be alone somewhere on the farm. Big Sweety understood. He had to do that, too, sometimes.

Every time Big Sweety and Momma Sweety had a break, though, Big Sweety had to hit the books and do a lot of homework. He thought his Momma was the toughest teacher he ever had. When he took his Senior Year finals, though, he had made the highest scores in the county. Several colleges wrote him saying they would sure love to have him at their school. They offered to pay for everything. He wasn’t sure, yet, that he wanted to go. While he thought about things, he poured himself into the work of the farm. That was two years ago, and he was still thinking.

Momma Sweety knew all along that Dad had been teaching Big Sweety about shooting and survival skills. One day, she came up to him and said, “Sweety, you need to go git yer brothers and teach ‘em how to do all those things your Poppa taught you. They’re old enough, now, and it is time fer ’em to learn.”

Big Sweety looked at his mom as if the poor woman had grown an extra head. “Um…H..how did you know about that?”, stammered Big Sweety.

“Son,” Momma Sweety said, “ a woman grows eyes everywhere when she becomes a Momma. They ain’t no such thing as a secret on my farm. A rooster don’t catch a bug without my knowin’ about it.  Now git. Take your brothers and teach ’em how to grow up’n do the “man things” yer dad taught you…and take Daisy, with you too.”

“DAISY?!?!?”, Big Sweety was exasperated at that. “Momma, Daisy is a girl. What’s she need to learn all that stuff for?”

Momma Sweety looked Big Sweety right in the eye and said, “Lookie here, young ‘un. My girls are gonna grow up and know everything your Daddy taught you. I ain’t gonna have no fainting daffodils on my farm. No sirree. A girl can do just about as many things as a boy can do, and they can do some things boys don’t even know exist. So I ain’t gonna have no arguin’. Go git yer sister and teach her just like your poppa taught you.”

Yes Ma’am.” Said Big Sweety. He knew better than argue with Momma Sweety when she got that look in her eyes. That stare could put the fear of God in a statue. He might be twice her size, and stronger than anyone around, but he was not about to cross Momma Sweety when she starts glancing at the big wooden spoon. She was always telling him, “You still ain’t too old for me to spank, boy!”. He believed her. Besides, he really loved her a lot. She was strong and soft at the same time. Besides, he needed most of those spankings. He was glad she knew when to hug him, and when to swat him. He figured he has to have the best mom in the world.

He went and got Daisy, Dan and “Hassle”, and taught them what his poppa taught him. He also taught them how to do all the things poppa had done to make a house a home. He knew that men played as important a role as women did when it comes to making a home. It’s just that they see different things as being important.

Funny how life just picks up and keeps moving. That was fine with Big Sweety. He had a naturally sunny disposition, and welcomed each new challenge. Nothing seemed to really get Big Sweety down. He has a kind heart, a generous nature, and his Momma was always sayn’, “That pup ain’t never met a stranger!” Which is true. He wanted everyone around him to feel welcome and part of the experience, what ever the experience at the time was.